Thank you for exploring the possibility of becoming involved in the Mood and Emotion Laboratory! The success of this laboratory depends upon the involvement of bright and motivated undergraduates and recent graduates, and we welcome your interest.

Our ongoing research projects all focus on emotion and its dysfunction. A number of these studies recruit patients with diagnosable psychiatric disorders such as depression, and involve the administration of clinical interviews. Many of our projects use multiple methods to study emotion such as physiological measures, behavioral measures, and measures of emotion experience.

 

Undergraduate Training

   

Graduate Training

  Dr. Rottenberg plans to accept one student for the 2017-2018 academic year

 

Bethanne Bower received a 1st Place Award for the Social Sciences Division at the USF Research Symposium, April 2008 lasjlasjalsjlajslajsljalsjalsjdlajsdlajsdlajdlajlaks Dr. Rottenberg with 2016 MEL Graduate Students (from left to right):
Lex Cowden Hindash, Kim O'Leary, Dr. Rottenberg, Ena Begovic, Sun Yoon

 

Undergraduate Training


Overview

An important facet of the MEL training experience is to mentor undergraduate students at the University of South Florida so that they can better understand research in clinical psychology. The MEL is designed to provide direct one-on-one mentoring regarding graduate school training and professional development. Typically, undergraduate students are paired with a doctoral level student and work with that doctoral student under the overall supervision of Dr. Rottenberg. Responsibilities often include attending weekly research meetings and gaining formal introduction and training into the ethical conduct of research. During the research meetings, we take care of administrative tasks, talk about conceptual and methodological issues related to work in progress, and check-in with various projects. Activities in the MEL may include running psychological experiments, being trained in clinical interviews, scheduling and running participants, entering data, helping with data reduction using customized physiological data reduction software, data analysis, behavioral coding, preparing stimuli for projects, doing literature searches, designing studies, maintaining lab equipment, screening potential study participants over the phone, and contacting recruitment sites. Undergraduates in the MEL have conducted independent senior honor's projects, attended professional conferences to present projects that have been run in the laboratory, and published their scholarly contributions. Importantly, students who work in our laboratory have been successful in ultimately pursing advanced training in graduate school.

Commitment

Research assistant positions are typically volunteer rather than paid (though paid positions are possible in the future). Because of the extensive training involved in becoming an RA in our laboratory, we ask for a minimum of a 9 hour commitment per week for at least two consecutive semesters, but many RAs end up working in our laboratory for several years. Applications from sophomores and juniors are especially welcome. Past USF research assistants have found it useful to register for directed study credit (3 units). Students from other home institutions are also welcome

Application Process

Students must apply to work in the MEL. These RA positions can be quite competitive and only mature, reliable, and hard working persons should consider applying. For example, most students who are successful in working in our laboratory typically maintain a 3.5 GPA or higher and have a specific interest in pursuing graduate education in clinical psychology or related fields. Previous research experience is also desirable but is not necessary. It is advisable to submit your application one semester ahead of the time that you want to actually start work ( e.g., in the Spring prior to the fall you want to work). If you are interested in applying to be an undergraduate research assistant in the lab,
 please fill out this online application and send to Dr. Rottenberg:  Download Application  Please note, that you will also have to include with your application the following:  a copy of your transcript (unofficial is fine), a copy of your CV or resume, and a writing sample (e.g., research paper written for a class).  The writing sample is optional. For further information about the application process please contact MEL graduate student Kim O'Leary (koleary@mail.usf.edu).

Undergraduates in the MEL have been successful at receiving awards and scholarships, presenting at conferences, co-authoring manuscripts, and getting into graduate school.  For the past several years, MEL undergraduates have received awards at the USF Undergraduate Research Symposium for their honors theses: Vanessa Wolvin in 2007, Bethanne Bower in 2008, Laurie Dempsey in 2009 (for her work with Dr. Marc Karver), and Jennifer Greene in 2010.

Recent Publications and Presentations Authored or Co-Authored by MEL Undergraduates:

Colontonio, A., Cowden Hindash, A.H., Goff, T., & Rottenberg, J. (Oct 2016). Perceived Stress and Emotion Regulation: Mediating factors against stress in dysphoric individuals. Post presented at annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, New York City, NY.

Cowden Hindash, A.H., Balouch, M., & Rottenberg, J. (Oct 2016). Perceived ability to cope with daily stressors moderates the effect of negative self-perception in response to a specific failure. Post presented at annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, New York City, NY.

Panaite, V., Whitington, A., Cowden Hindash, A.H., O’Leary, K., Schaefer, L.M., & Rottenberg, J. (Oct 2016). Sadness reactivity across positive contexts in depression. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology, Baltimore, MD.

Woerner, M. Cowden Hindash, A., & Rottenberg, J (2015). Emotion regulation as mediator for interpretation biases in dysphoria. Poster accepted for presentation at the 49th Annual Conference for the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Chicago, 2015.

Bower, B., Bylsma, L. M., Morris, B. H., & Rottenberg, J. (2010). Poor reported sleep quality predicts low positive affect in daily life among healthy and mood disordered persons. The Journal of Sleep Research, 19, 323-332.

Howard, A., Morris, B., Goldman, M., & Rottenberg, J. (2010).  Intentions to get drunk, but not drinking itself, predict depression symptoms among emerging adults.  Poster presented at the 8th Annual USF Undergraduate Research Symposium, Tampa, FL, April, 2010. 

Howard, A., Morris, B., Goldman, M., & Rottenberg, J. (2010).  Drinking intentions predict depression and anxiety symptoms beyond frequency of intoxication among emerging adults.  Poster presented at the 24th National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR(r) 24) at University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, April, 2010.

Howard, A., Morris, B., Goldman, M., & Rottenberg, J. (2009).  Intentions to get drunk, but not drinking itself, predict depression symptoms among emerging adults.  Posted presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology, Minneapolis, Minnesota, October, 2009. 

Rottenberg, J., Bylsma, L.M., Wolvin, V., & Vingerhoets, A. J.J.M. (2008). Tears of sorrow, tears of joy: An individual differences approach to crying. Personality and Individual Differences, 45, 367-371.

Bower, B., Bylsma, L.M., Morris, B.H. & Rottenberg, J. (2008).  The Impact of Sleep Duration on Emotional Reactivity in Major and Minor Depression.  Poster presented at the 6th Annual USF Undergraduate Research Symposium, Tampa, FL, April, 2008.

Malchow, A., Bylsma, L.M., Rottenberg, J., & Salomon, K. (2007).  The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Cardiovascular Reactivity. Poster presented at the 6th Annual USF Undergraduate Research Symposium, Tampa, FL, April, 2008.

Brauer, L., Long, M. K., & Rottenberg, J. (2007). Does depressed persons’ overgeneral autobiographical memory generalize across memory tasks? Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology, Iowa City, Iowa, October, 2007

Wolvin, V., Bylsma, L.M., Vingerhoets, A. J. J. M., & Rottenberg, J. (2007), Personality and post-crying catharsis. Poster presented at the fourth international conference on 'The (Non)Expression of Emotions in Health and Disease,” Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands, October, 2007.

Wolvin, V., Bylsma, L.M., Vingerhoets, A. J. J. M., & Rottenberg, J. (2007), Personality and post-crying catharsis.  Poster presented at the 21st National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR(r) 21) at Dominican University of California, April, 2007.

Wolvin, V., Bylsma, L.M., & Rottenberg, J. (2007), Personality and post-crying catharsis.  Poster presented at the 5th Annual USF Undergraduate Research Symposium, Tampa, FL, April, 2007.

Rottenberg, J., Clift, A., Bolden, S., & Salomon, K. (2007). RSA fluctuation in major depressive disorder. Psychophysiology, 44, 450-458.

Salomon, K., Rottenberg, J., Clift, A., & Bolden, S. (2007). RSA in major depressive disorder: Sleep quality, physical activity and respiration account for deficits in RSA level but not deficits in RSA reactivity and rebound. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society, Budapest, Hungary, March, 2007.

Bolden, S., Clift, A., Salomon, K., & Rottenberg, J. (2006). Blunted RSA reactivity and recovery in major depressive disorder. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology, San Diego, California, October, 2006.

Note: Bold denotes a current or former undergraduate in the MEL.
 

Ashley Malchow presenting her poster at the USF Research Symposium, April 2008


 

Graduate Training

Graduate students join the Mood and Emotion Laboratory via the clinical doctoral program in psychology.  Graduate students pursue a range of topics in the areas of mood and emotion and have the opportunity to work with clinical populations.  Refer to the publications and current projects section of this website for more information about current and recent projects.  If you are interested in the Clinical Psychology PhD program at USF, see the psychology department website for more information about the program and how to apply:

http://psychology.usf.edu/grad/program/